The Math Team

Betty Mock

Betty Mock

Betty Mock received her PhD in mathematics from the Courant Institute at New York University, working under the direction of Professor Olaf Widlund. She has ten years of teaching experience at the undergraduate level. Most recently (2007 to 2009) she designed and taught undergraduate courses in differential equations, numerical analysis, linear algebra, and “2nd year first year calculus.” The purpose of the latter was not to review first year calculus, but to explore the concepts in more depth, without moving to the level of advanced calculus or analysis.

Dr. Mock has spent the bulk of her career as an entrepreneur and computer innovator. She was a co-founder of Sundance Software, which provided customized systems for large corporate clients such as Mobil Oil, Pepsi-Cola, and Shearson-Lehman. She pioneered a very successful specification methodology to bring systems in on time and on budget. She supported development of that methodology into a code-generation program which substantially cut the amount of custom work to be done, and vastly reduced bugs and error. She trained all of the programmers at Sundance Software, and built Sundance from a standing start to a $2 million annual operation.

Following her retirement from Sundance Software, she became a cofounder of Summertrios, Inc. She built this chamber music non-profit from nothing to a large, well respected and financially sound organization. She maintained her programming skills by automating most of the administrative work of Summertrios. This included a very detailed and intricate scheduling system which allows maximum flexibility while controlling the implementation of many constraints. Those programs are the basis for the software Moxart will be offering to the non-profit world.

Dr. Mock left Summertrios in 2009 and built an impressive team to found Moxart, which was incorporated in June, 2010.

Peter Lax

Peter Lax

Peter D. Lax is one of the foremost pure and applied mathematicians of the twentieth century. He was awarded the 2005 Abel Prize [mathematics equivalent of the Nobel Prize] “for his groundbreaking contributions to the theory and application of partial differential equations and to the computation of their solutions.” After fleeing Hungary for New York City in 1941, Prof. Lax graduated from Stuyvesant High School. He was then drafted and spent the war years in Los Alamos working on the Manhattan Project. After the war he returned to New York University where he earned a PhD under Kurt Friedrichs. Professor Lax spent essentially his entire career at NYU.

In the 1950’s and 60’s Professor Lax laid the foundations for the modern theory of both linear and non-linear hyperbolic equations. He made fundamental contributions to both the theoretical side of the subject, as well as the numerical side. Indeed, the Lax Equivalence Theorem is one of the cornerstones of the theory of the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with Ralph Phillips, Lax introduced a new, geometrically inspired approach to scattering theory, which proved enormously influential in the subsequent development of the subject. Lax introduced the “Lax pair” formulation for completely integrable systems, which has in many ways become the definitive description for this subject. To quote from his Able prize citation: “Peter D. Lax stands out in joining together pure and applied mathematics, combining a deep understanding of analysis with an extraordinary capacity to find unifying concepts. He has had a profound influence, not only by his research, but also by his writing, his lifelong commitment to education and his generosity to younger mathematicians.”

Prof. Lax is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Philosophical Society, Foreign Associate of the French Academy of Sciences, Soviet Academy of Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and Academia Sinica, Beijing. He is the recipient of many prizes and awards including the Abel Prize [equivalent in mathematics of the Nobel prize] Norbert Wiener Prize, the National Medal of Science, the Wolf Prize, the Steele Prize, and nine honorary doctorates.